Origami Meditator

Origami Meditator

June 2020

Three Carvings

Three Carvings

September 2018

Oil Bars

Oil Bars

October 2016

Winged Lily and Babushka

Winged Lily and Babushka

April 2016

Limpets and Barnacles

Limpets and Barnacles

November 2015

Replica Papyrus

Replica Papyrus

July 2015

Seated Lady

Seated Lady

June 2015

Works in Progress

Works in Progress

June 2015

Performance of the Vision on Earth

Performance of the Vision on Earth

April 2015

Replicating the Beauty of Nature

Replicating the Beauty of Nature

March 2015

Performance (Purple and Pink)

Performance (Purple and Pink)

March 2015

Using a Tablet for Sketching

Using a Tablet for Sketching

February 2015

Prostrate Figure

Prostrate Figure

January 2015

Worry

Worry

November 2014

Meditation

Meditation

November 2014

Footsteps on Beer Beach

Footsteps on Beer Beach

October 2014

Standing Lady

Standing Lady

October 2014

Modest Beginnings and Finished Products

Modest Beginnings and Finished Products

September 2014

Back to the Studio

Back to the Studio

September 2014

The Significance of Circles

The Significance of Circles

September 2014

Programming as a Creative Process

Programming as a Creative Process

September 2014

Carving Spiral Embrace

Carving Spiral Embrace

September 2014

Buried Treasure

Buried Treasure

June 2011

Baddies at the Bus-Stop

Baddies at the Bus-Stop

November 2011

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Articles



Origami Meditator

June 2020


I have dabbled in origami since I was a young lad - I believe I first saw some in a Rupert Bear annual and was fascinated. I then bought 'New Adventures in Origami' (aka 'Origami 2') by Robert Harbin, and began leaving piles of little paper models scattered around the house.

Although I have enjoyed making origami models over the years, I only ever created one design myself. It was a baby penguin, and I came upon it through doodling.

Recently I decided to have another go at designing an origami model. I started by doodling, but got nowhere - lots of interesting shapes, but nothing that looked like anything. Ideally, what I wanted was a simple model (these are often the most pleasing), one that represented something significant to me, one that had some 3D element to it, and one that I designed rather than happened upon by accident.

What I came up with is a meditating figure that sits up with legs outwards. It is a simple model, with only 14 steps and no difficult folds (only valley, mountain and reverse folds). I am very pleased with it.

The process of creating instructions (available here: Origami Meditator Instructions) for the model was surprisingly involved. The technical nature of the task, which involved precision, clarity, consistency and careful planning, appealed to many aspects of my personality.

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